Grammar Repair Shop

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Getting compound subjects straight

March 1, 2018

We all know that a singular subject takes a singular verb and a plural subject takes a plural verb, but what about a compound subject?

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Eliminate wordiness when you mean ‘because’

February 5, 2018

There are a lot of ways to say “because,” including “due to,” “since” and “as.” Bonnie Mills sorts out the best ways to use these words.

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Subjects and verbs getting along?

January 5, 2018

Subject-verb agreement means you pair singular subjects with singular verbs and plural subjects with plural verbs. Basic subject-verb agreement comes naturally for most native English speakers, but certain combinations can trip up even seasoned writers. Some tips.

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Comprise, compose or consitute?

December 7, 2017

Here are examples of the correct ways to use comprise, compose, and constitute.

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Avoid common spelling errors in idioms

November 2, 2017

Mark Nichol, writing at Daily Writing Tips, offers a list of common spelling mistakes in idioms.

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Edit and proofread your own writing

October 5, 2017
A second pair of eyes is always ideal, but having to apply your skills without a safety net will always happen at some point.
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How to repair a comma splice

September 7, 2017
“It hasn’t rained for three weeks, all the flowers are dying” is an example of a comma splice. It’s called that because a comma is used to splice together two sentences, which is incorrect. How do you fix one?
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‘Into’ and ‘Onto’ vs. ‘In To’ and ‘On To’

August 3, 2017
Here’s a classic is-it-this-way or is-it-that-way problem that a lot of people get wrong.
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Words are too long–let’s shorten them!

June 6, 2017
Knowing the difference between the types of phrase shorteners can help you use them correctly in writing.
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Make the colon your punctuation ally

April 6, 2017
Colons are most often used when introducing a list, and their primary function is to tell the reader that more information is on its way.
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